Monthly Archives: January 2021

Step 6: Ako bu Ije

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“Ako bu Ije”

(Wisdom is the way)

Welcome back to the 13 steps. In the last step Akaraka, you learned how your destiny is literally in your hands, and it’s completely up to you what paths you want to take and what vehicles (your Ikenga) you’ll need on your journey.

If you recall, when the question came up regarding the best way to reach your destination (destiny), my response was to use your spiritual GPS. Today, I will explain what it is, and how you can access it. But before that, I’d like to explain all 4 features of your internal navigation system, which are utilized in the journey that we call life. Buckle up and I’ll show you:

Feature 1: Learning Mode 

This feature is very self explanatory. It allows one to learn from experience. It comes with two settings. The first setting is learning only from your own experience. This is the natural setting you’re born with, and is the one that makes you touch a hot surface just once.

The second setting is also learning from the experiences of others. In essence, studying those who traveled the same or similar paths as you’re on or trying to get to. This can be done by studying proverbs (ilu), philosophy (nkà ihe ọmụma), parables, history, biographies of various people as well as directly getting mentorship or coaching. This setting will give you far better results than the first one.

Unfortunately, we all know some people who have this feature turned off completely. These are the people who constantly repeat the same mistakes over and over again and seem unable or unwilling to learn. Don’t be like them. I recommend that you use setting two.

Feature 2: Discernment Filter

Besides learning mode, your internal navigation system also collects alot of information from your environment. Some of this data includes the conditions in front of you, various signs (stop, go, slow down, etc.), as well as messages you get from fellow travelers. 

Instead of two settings, this filter has a range from low to high. If the setting is too low, you’ll believe everything you’re presented with, which is called gullibility. On the other hand, if the setting is put too high, you’ll reject pretty much everything that doesn’t already agree with you. People in this setting include contrarians and ndi ara (deluded people).

If feature one (learning mode) is on the second setting (learning from the experience of others), you will be able to find the right discernment filter much quicker. You will discover that looks are often deceiving and if something sounds too good to be true, it likely is. 

Feature 3: Judgement 

There will be times when you will be forced to make a choice. You may come to a fork in the road, or it may be a crossroad. Regardless, you’ll have to decide where you go next. How do you make that choice? You have to utilize your judgement. And just like learning mode, it’s something that should improve with more use.

The settings for this feature range from easy to hard.  You utilize your judgement on whether to take the wide way or the narrow one; the popular path or the road less traveled. You decide whether or not the speed of journey matters more than the ease of the path; whether you want to go the safe route or take more risks. At the end of the day, the choice is up to you. However I will say that if you’re reading the 13 steps, you’re exercising better judgement than most people.

Feature 4: Intuition 

Last but not least, we come to the last feature, which I call your spiritual GPS. For anyone who needs a refresher, GPS (global positioning system) works by having satellites hovering above the earth moving at the exact same speed as our planet’s rotation. It’s the most advanced feature in your internal navigation system, but ironically it’s the only one that you’re born with fully operational. When you come into the world, you’re only learning from your own mistakes, you pretty much believe whatever you’re told, and your judgement is quite poor. However your spiritual GPS is working quite well as a child, but usually gets turned down as you get older, to the point that most adults have it switched off entirely. 

Your spiritual GPS is known by most people as the intuition. It’s the source of one’s instincts, epiphanies and innovations. While learning from the experience of others is good, what about when you decide to go on a path that no one has gone before? Or down the same path in a new way? What is the thing that pulls you towards your destiny? What makes you ask questions in the first place? What gives you prophetic or revealing dreams?

Feature four when left on as an adult supercharges features one, two & three, and is what I would like to call “Ako bu Ije.” Ako bu Ije will allow you to go much further than other people that are not guided by it. You will be able to learn extremely quickly; which is sometimes called beginner’s luck, or a natural talent or instinct. You will be able to better discern whether or not someone is telling the truth, or if things are really as they seem. Reminder: Your intuition is already on when you’re born! If left on as you mature, you will be guided by Ako bu Ije. You must simply remember (Ncheta) how to bring your potential and kinetic energy (Chi na Eke) back in sync. And of course, your dreamscape (Nrọ) is the easiest way to do just that. 

In summary, if you allow all four features of your internal navigation system to remain on, you will be guided by Ako bu Ije, and you can know what divinely based self image (Ikenga) you need to travel along your destiny (Akaraka). 

Step 6: “Wisdom is the way. I seek to learn from the experience of others, have stronger discernment, and exercise better judgement. And I will stop getting in the way of my own intuition” 

Action Items: 

Devote time to studying proverbs, philosophy, parables, history & biographies.

Get a coach or mentor, if possible.

Ask questions.

Be willing to accept information, even if you don’t want to hear it.

Reflect on past decisions, and see how you could have made them differently.

Stay tuned for Step 7,  which is coming out on the next new moon, February 11. Yagazie (It shall be well with you).

Igụ Ọfọ Ụtụtụ: Igbo Morning Prayers versus Western Morning Affirmations

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For a several years now I have followed a Canadian man named Stefan James on youtube. His brand is Projec Life Mastery. I have watched him go from average Joe to internet millionaire by dedicating his life to self improvement. Early in his life transformation, he came up with a morning ritual that he practiced every day.

He changes his morning ritual sometimes to suit his life circumstances, but a morning ritual has always been a part of his day since he went from living on his friend’s couch to making thousands to millions on the internet. Here is one of his first morning ritual videos:

Stefan is just one of many success gurus online who promote the use of morning rituals for success. They call them different things, like morning affirmations, setting the intentions for the day, visualizing or scripting. Many of these people’s focus is on setting a goal, and using the “Law of Attraction” to bring it towards you by focusing on achieving it. This often involves reciting the goals you have set for yourself, expressing gratitude by thanking spiritual forces (like the Universe) for giving you what you need and helping you achieve past goals). Getting into an emotional state of positivity is another important part of many of these Western rituals. What is important is that the practitioners of these often center these rituals around a goal or some goals they have for their life. While the traditional Igbo practice of Igụ ọfọ ụtụtụ is not exactly like positive affirmations or setting the intentions of the day, I can’t help but note some similarities.

The ọfọ in Igbo culture is like a contract, the symbolic manifestation being a staff/rod passed down a family lineage. The staff (sometimes called the “staff of justice”) represents the rights of the holder which they often inherit from previous generations. It may be called upon during disputes (much like a written contract which, in Western cultures, is analyzed line by line to see the agreed upon terms and conditions and decide who should be awarded the rights during a trial). Igụ ọfọ ụtụtụ (a morning prayer in traditional Igbo land) calls upon ancestors and spiritual guardians to participate in the day’s activities of the the Igbo.

ọfọ bundle of sticks and other sacred objects
ọfọ bundle of sticks and other sacred objects

The Igbo’s “goals” (as the Westerners would say), are determined by those of his forebearers. In a way, certain members (especially the oldest son, or Ọkpara) are tasked with taking up the duties where their parents left off. So, they can not set a goal without taking into account that which he currently holds in his hand as a duty.

Often times, Westerners set seemingly arbitrary goals. “I want to be a millionaire,” or “I want to lose weight.” These goals are often not tied to any divine purpose rather than vain desires and selfish ambitions. The makers of the goals, most times have nothing driving them to achieve the goal, and it is noted that 90% of people do not achieve their “new years resolution” (which is a common goal-setting time in the Western world). However, since Igbo goals are often tied to a greater calling, often one passed down from their ancestors, or parents. The duty of achievement is more integral to their very way of life.